Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs

Posts Tagged ‘buckwheat noodles

Disclosure: This was a complimentary meal courtesy of Evolution Fresh. This is not a sponsored post.

My favourite Boost Juice is Passion Mango. An icy blend of mango, passionfruit, tropical juice, sorbet and yoghurt, it is my standard order for on-the-go sustenance. I like that they have a store at Sydney airport where it’s economical to pay seven dollars for a smoothie instead of double that for greasy noodles or oily pizza.

The second Evolution Fresh opened in Downtown Seattle last Friday. Located opposite Nordstrom on Pine, the space is subdivided from the adjacent Starbucks, the owner of the Evolution Fresh brand.

I had peeked into the first Evolution Fresh store in Bellevue when I was on the Eastside for lunch at Din Tai Fung. It has a salad bar and seating, whereas the Downtown Seattle one is compact, designed for ‘juice and food good to go’.

Banners line the wall with appetising photos of the signature bowls, a flowchart for cold pressed juices, and a whiteboard for customers to scrawl messages.

The shelves are laden with bottles of juices and pre-packed meals. Sweet treats were in glass cloches and jars.

Wire baskets of fruits, drink bottles, an apron and a chopping board were hooked onto metal rails in a corner of the tiny kitchen.

Six screens panelled the back wall display the beverages menu.

Eight juices are available on tap, including organic apple and organic carrot.

Lemon, ginger and cayenne pepper, the spicy lemonade piqued my interest.

Categorised into easy, balanced and green, a mix of six juices are in cleansing packs.

Breakfast items intermingled with snacks, signature bowls, sauces, sandwiches, salads and wraps. Each has a colourful nutrition label.

I scanned for the keyword, mango! Mango, papaya, pineapple and apple juice were a summery medley, the Smooth Mango was refreshing.

I was a frequent patron of Saladworks in Sydney and the signature bowls are a similar concept. Fast and fresh, each bowl has a healthful serving of vegetables, nuts and seeds. Spinach, julienned carrot, sugar snap peas, roasted red peppers, sautéed shiitake, grilled portabella, scallions, coriander and parsley were layered on top of cold buckwheat noodles.

The buckwheat noodles signature bowl was paired with tamari five spice sauce.

I drizzled the viscous dressing over the spinach leaves and gently tossed it through. It was crunchy and herbaceous, a substantial size for lunch.

Breakfast, lunch and dinner, Evolution Fresh is convenient and nourishing.

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It was a pleasant May in Seattle. I did not feel sodden as I did last spring and we were blessed with many glorious days as a prelude to the northern summer. On a pleasant Saturday we enjoyed apéritifs at Tavern Law and sauntered down to Momiji (紅葉) for dinner with a group of Australian expats and tourists.

The sister restaurant of Umi Sake House in Belltown, Momiji is Japanese for maple. Painted burgundy, the front bar featured a curious white latticed lampshade and was saturated in natural light.

With the exception of the wide street frontage, the layout of Momiji is the same as Umi’s. A corridor opened to a spacious dining room. The counter had a prime view of the sushi chefs deftly slicing sashimi and shaping nigiri.

At the centre was a serene Japanese garden.

We perused the comprehensive menu as I sipped a summery cocktail, The Getaway. In a tall glass was Hendrick’s Gin, Pimm’s and soda topped with a lychee.

We ordered an array of dishes among the seven of us. First was ahi pokē. Diced ahi tuna and cucumber were tossed with onion slivers, shichimi (Japanese seasoning), soy sauce and sesame seeds. The first time I ate pokē was at a Flying Fish cooking class. A Hawaiian salad, it had a luscious contrast of textures.

A plate of prawn and vegetable tempura was coated in a lumpy batter and pleasingly crunchy.

Poached beets, and a mound of arugula and shiso were drizzled with lemon vinaigrette.

Portions of grilled king crab was paired with ponzu dipping sauce and mixed greens. A generous serving, the crustacean was charred and meaty.

Soft shell crabs were pan fried to golden brown. The spindly morsels were sweet and succulent.

Wrinkled and charred, the half dozen prawn and scallop gyoza were juicy parcels of seafood encased in a thin wrapper.

Buckwheat noodles were stir-fried with cubes of tofu and an assortment of vegetables. Garnished with green onions, pickles and nori, the triangular bowl of yakisoba was a symphony of flavours.

With casual ambience and quality ingredients, Momiji is a delicious addition to 12th Avenue in Capitol Hill.

I traipsed up to University Village on a weekday for an impromptu lunch at Shun with Lovely Lanvin and Seattle Bon Vivant. An overcast morning, the clouds dissipated into a brilliant afternoon. Shun is located about half a kilometre above U Village on the ground floor of an apartment building.

Shun has a three course lunch for fifteen dollars for Seattle Restaurant Week and it was nearly full by midday. There are three sections to the restaurant. To the left of the entrance is a long and narrow space, perfect for group gatherings. To the right is the main dining room and sushi counter.

We were seated at the sushi counter and Japanese greetings were exchanged. Chef Yoshi’s nimble hands were making nigiri by the dozens as he chatted with Shirley. Ceramic bowls and plates were neatly stacked on shelves and a decorative plate depicted a traditional scene.

An ornate pot and dish set for soy sauce.

Three portions of seared albacore tuna and mixed greens were drizzled with an onion soy dressing. The sashimi was a little soft and the dressing accentuated the sweetness of the fish.

I selected tempura soba for the main. A large bowl of savoury broth swirled with firm strands of buckwheat noodles. A liberal sprinkle of shichimi and I slurped gently, comforted by the spicy warmth.

Two prawns, a broccoli floret and a potato fritter, the tempura were served separately. I did not put my tempura into the broth until Shirley explained that’s how it’s eaten in Japan! I like the crunch of the tempura batter but that is what adds flavour to the noodle soup.

Dessert was presented on a lime and white chequered tile with a daffodil border. A sliced strawberry and a dollop whipped cream accessorised the caramel flan. Silky custard and sticky caramel was a lovely final course.

The restaurant was still full when we left, Seattle Restaurant Week is popular!


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