Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs

Posts Tagged ‘Korean

Savoury and sweet pastizzis at The Original Maltese Café in Surry Hills Sydney.

Coffee art at Strand Arcade in Sydney.

Sardinian cooking class with Pilu at Freshwater‘s Giovanni Pilu at Accoutrement in Sydney.

Bacon and egg breakfast sandwich at Mr Stuzzichini in Hunters Hill Sydney.

Burrata and beet salad at Pendolino in Sydney.

Spectacular vista at Café Harbour View at Taronga Zoo in Mosman Sydney.

A country lunch at Grazing in Gundaroo.

Milanese cuisine at Balla by Stefano Manfredi in Pyrmont Sydney.

Pastries at Bécasse Bakery in Westfield Sydney.

Malaysian hawker food at Sassy’s Red by Chinta Ria in Westfield Sydney.

Regional Chinese fare at Spice Temple by Neil Perry in Sydney.

Scones at The Old Bakery Tea Rooms in Berrima.

Vegetarian cooking class with Poppy‘s Jerry Traunfeld at PCC West Seattle.

Lunch at Vessel in Downtown Seattle.

Dungeness crab, seaweed noodle, spicy red curry and crème fraîche at Revel in Fremont.

Chocolate tasting at Northwest Chocolate Festival.

I love Korean barbecue. My aunt has a favourite in Hong Kong that I’ve been to several times. A gas grill is at the centre of the table and you order an assortment of marinated meats, seafood and vegetables. The communally cooked morsels are dipped in a variety of condiments and eaten with half a dozen side dishes.

In Seattle I’ve had delicious meals at Revel in Fremont and another Korean restaurant has just opened in Inn at the Market. The lovely Kimberly invited me as her plus one to Chan’s opening party.

The kimchi hangover soup piqued my interest!

We peeked in prior to the event to take photos of the interior. The open kitchen was buzzing with activity as chefs busily prepared the tasting menu.

A sideboard was laden with stemware, ice buckets and wine bottles.

Earthy tones decorated the dining room.

We chatted over coffee at Le Pichet and returned to a crowded Chan to sample their fusion fare. I eschewed the cocktails and opted for a glass of Champagne.

A square plate had a mound of ahi tuna slivers with slices of avocado. The tuna tartare was seasoned with an appetising soy ginger sauce and chilli oil.

A ball of rice was doused in sweet and spicy sauce, and surrounded by julienned vegetables. The bowl of bibimbap was served cold and mixed through for a pleasant combination of flavours and textures.

The highlight was the bulgogi slider. A charred bun had a dollop of chilli mayonnaise and tender pieces of marinated beef topped with cucumber kimchi. The dense bread was a sturdy container for the burger contents.

More sweet than chilli, fried chicken wing portions were dusted in a light batter, drizzled with a chilli caramel glaze, and garnished with peanuts and green onions.

Crispy and sticky, these must been eaten with fingers!

Dessert was a tiny pot of ginger crème brûlée. I cracked the candy top with the back of my spoon and underneath was a smooth and aromatic custard.

Our evening concluded with supper at The Coterie Room where Carol and I introduced Kimberly to the savoury crunch of ham cracklings dunked in fondue!

Located in the same courtyard as Marché and Watson Kennedy, Chan is a welcomed addition to the diverse collection of restaurants in Pike Place Market. We attended the opening party courtesy of Social Magnet.

Marination Station. I love that the name rhymes. After our failed attempt a couple of months ago, we knew exactly where to find the permanent location of Marination Mobile. Above the QFC on the corner of Broadway and Pike, Marination Station is concealed from the busy thoroughfare.

Outside is a patio with a narrow communal bench. A laminated menu is tacked on the glass door and inside is a small space with additional seating and the ordering counter.

‘Aloha served daily’, the cuisine is a fusion of Korean and Hawaiian influences.

Customer feedback quotes, photos and drawings decorate the stainless steel fridge. Pithy comments are scrawled on by staff.

Mr S quenched his thirst with a Hawaiian Sun tropical iced tea which was non-carbonated and refreshingly sweet.

We shared a miso ginger chicken taco as an appetiser. Tender pieces of marinated chicken are topped with their signature nunya sauce and coleslaw, and wrapped in two warm tortillas. A squeeze of lime and the taco was devoured quickly.

Mr S selected the spicy pork torta. Slices of spicy pork drizzled with their signature nunya sauce, pickled peppers and onions, and coleslaw are stuffed into a Macrina demi baguette with a thick spread of guacamole. The crusty bread soaked up the condiments and the torta was pleasantly crunchy.

I opted for the kimchi rice bowl with kalbi beef served with a sunny side up fried egg, green onions and furikake (Japanese seasoning). There was a generous amount of marinated beef short ribs. The sweet saltiness contrasted with the fiery kimchi fried rice. The creamy yolk tempered the heat of the chilli momentarily!

I recall eating an omelette with diced spam when I was a child, an easy meal cooked by my grandmother while babysitting me. I pondered the spam slider as we left.

Bibimbap, bulgogi and kimchi are the only words in my Korean cuisine vocabulary. With the exception of Korean barbecues, I haven’t eaten much Korean food as I’m averse to fermented vegetables and have a low tolerance for spiciness.

I had read about the interesting backgrounds of the owners of Joule - a combination of classic French techniques, Korean heritage and American flavours is a formula for modern, creative dishes.

With a willing driver in Luuvu, it was a quick trip (compared to walking!) to Joule’s sister restaurant, Revel, for a weekday lunch. On a leafy suburban street, rusty sheets of metal cladded the corner of the building with the restaurant name stamped in.

Fairy lights were strung over at the entrance, and inside was a sleek, clean space with minimalistic design. The room was well lit and the open kitchen featured a long communal bench. The bar, Quoin, is at the back and there’s also a patio for al fresco dining.

We sat at the counter and watched the chefs in action. It was a quiet lunch service and a man spent the entire time we were there zesting limes! The chefs moved with speed and precision, stirring, flipping and plating with style and purpose.

Each table were presented with a tray of condiments. Three appeared to be fiery and the dark syrup was soy based. Our waitress detailed the ingredients in each and warned us about the chilli oil. I stared at each with suspicion.

Our waitress recommended three dishes to share and after much polite toing and froing we selected one each from the dumpling, noodle and rice sections. It was a compact menu and the other options were salad, pancake and sweet sandwich for dessert.

The dumplings were stuck together in a row. Both sides were seared, then covered and steamed with a splash of broth. A bite into the firm but silky dough revealed a lump of minced short rib which was rich and moist. The scattering of shallot and scallion freshened up the meaty parcel.

An alarmingly bright tangerine colour, the slippery rice noodles were stir-fried in a sweet chilli sauce with a generous amount of smoked pork belly. The just-enough-for-me spiciness cut through the fatty cubes of porcine delicacy. I could have greedily devoured the whole bowl myself! I didn’t eat any of the pale slices of sauerkraut though.

The rice was scooped into bowls with a large plastic paddle fork and the thick tines were used to fluff the plump grains. Our rice bowl consisted of albacore tuna, fennel kimchi and escarole.

A river of golden egg yolk swirled through the protein and vegetables. The mild sourness of the fennel kimchi and slight bitterness of the escarole balanced with the sweet and succulent tuna. The bean paste condiment paired well with the flavours of the rice bowl.

We forewent an ice cream sandwich for a gelato at D’Ambrosio for dessert but my curiosity is piqued and I shall return for a fusion brunch!


Enter your email address to subscribe to Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 452 other followers

Categories

Archive

Creative Commons License
Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
© 2011 Tossed Salads and Scrambled Eggs - all rights reserved
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 452 other followers